How to plan startup development with Happy Startup Canvas

In this article Dasha makes this statement;

Have you noticed that many young entrepreneurs make more efforts to attract investors than get users for their product? Don’t be like them. It sends the wrong message of you caring more about how much your startup makes than how you can help people to address their pain points.

I could not agree more.  It really comes down to how clearly  founders understand their customers and their pain. And their ‘soft’ or systemic thinking, which is needed to build a sustainable business. The author goes on to make a case for finding purpose, vision, and values for your startup.

She nailed it. Well worth the read.

Tagged on Pocket
Read the full version from the author’s website.

How To Convince Leaders To Avoid Business Plans When Validating New Ideas Strategyzer

In this article Kavi makes the following point;

A business plan assumes you know all the answers for a given idea. That’s hardly the case. Teams spend hours and hours compiling fantastic forecasts, and will spend tons of money hiring people to build technology or products that have no evidence to support their success. You can always make the numbers look good in a plan and argue how well it will work, but the plan will mean absolutely nothing without rigorous testing and evidence. It’s a fine line between vision and hallucination.

I can not tell you how many times I have made the same mistake. It is dangerous to believe your own bu!! $#it.  Experiments over experts.  Simple.

Obviously, I have never developed a business plan I did not initially believe in and I have quite the collection of spreadsheets that prove the author’s point.  Over time, I have learned to develop processes that allow our team to quickly validate and iterate on our ideas. Using tools like Strategyzer’s  Canvas is a big part of that process.  The quicker we can get an idea off the board and into a system that allows us to build on and test/validate the plan the better. And keeping it “cheap” just means we can invest in and diversify our portfolio of ideas on our way to innovation.

Tagged on Pocket
Read the full version from the author’s website.

How to Find the Customers Who Need Your Product

“Aspiring founders who think they’ve developed an amazing offering often believe that their product will sell themselves.”

No such luck. Take the time to get to know your customers before you expect them to know you. Here is another great example of a process to develop, test, and retest assumptions.

Tagged on Pocket
Read the full version from the author’s website.